D5.1 Executive Summary

(Communication requirements in Mas2tering can be classified into two categories: generic requirements and application-specific requirements. Whereas generic requirements relate to communications concerning the management of the platform, application-specific requirements relate to communications concerning services offered by applications built on the platform. In addition, the deliverable identifies the different layers of communication in the Mas2tering platform. This document provides a high level design of the inter-communication between agents and the agents’ communication with other smart grid components that are considered in the three Mas2tering use cases. Mas2tering communication architecture consists of a holonic organisation of the multi-agent system and addresses challenges of the smart grid such as security, scalability and distributed management.
The content of exchanged messages between agents needs to conform to a common syntax and semantics. The standard language specification named “Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents – Agent Communication Language” (FIPA-ACL) is supported in the JADE framework adopted by Mas2tering. An upper ontology based on Common Information Model (CIM) is considered a candidate to facilitate data exchange and interoperability between agents and with other components. IEC 61850 supports interoperability between Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) within substations. The document discusses the use of FIPA-ACL, CIM, IEC 61850 and other relevant standards for the message specification and communication between agents.

A communication model is described that identifies communication links between the different types of agents and the characteristics of the communication. Agent types include socio-economic agents, control agents, service agents, physical agents and management agents. The model further describes protocols and other specifications that are required to facilitate the communication between agents (including communication with components outside the MAS) at different interconnection levels. Security and privacy considerations in the communication between agents and grid components including security technologies and standards to be used are also analyzed.
FIWARE Generic Enablers (GEs) provide a range of non-domain specific support features that can be leveraged by Mas2tering platform. The GE evaluation described in the deliverable indicates that the most relevant GEs are in the area of enhancing communication security and privacy. One of the main challenges in using FIWARE GEs is that they can be removed from their catalogue as in the case of Content based Security GE which has been removed during our evaluation. For example, several GEs that have been used in FINESCE project(http://www.finesce.eu/) have already been removed. This may cause serious problems if a GE is no longer supported by its developers or becomes inaccessible.
The document also discusses the design of the communication and interfaces for each of the three use cases. It describes and examines the following topics:

  • The grid hardware devices that interact with the MAS components, device and agent locations, communication needs and operational constraints,
  • The communication-related standards and technologies that need to be used or integrated in the implementation of communication components of the use case,
  • Guidelines on the locations of agents to identify the best locations for the MAS components in the electricity network ensuring that Mas2tering can obtain required information while not affecting the operation of the grid.

D5.1 Table of Contents

  • Executive summary
  • Document Information
  • Table of Contents
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • Abbreviations
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1 Relationship to Other Deliverables
  • 1.2 Document Structure
  • 2 Agent Interfaces and Communication
  • 2.1 Agent Communication Requirements
  • 2.1.1 Generic communication requirements
  • 2.1.2 Application-­‐specific communication requirements
  • 2.1.3 Types of Agents
  • 2.2 Mas2tering Data Model, Agent Ontology and Content Language
  • 2.2.1 Data Model and Ontology
  • 2.2.2 Content Language
  • 2.3 Agent Communication Modelling
  • 2.3.1 Platform communication architecture
  • 2.3.2 Different types of communications
  • 2.3.3 Agent communication Protocols
  • 3 Supporting Communication Components
  • 3.1 Integration of FIWARE Generic Enablers
  • 3.2 Agent and Grid Component Communication Security and Privacy
  • 3.2.1 Security considerations
  • 3.2.2 Security technologies and standards
  • 4 Mas2tering Use Case Communication and Interfaces
  • 4.1 Use Case 1 – Secure and effective connection of commercial home energy boxes with public DSO smart meter and consumption profile optimization
  • 4.1.1 Communication with Electric Grid and Component Locations
  • 4.1.2 Standards Usage
  • 4.1.3 Guidelines on Locations
  • 4.2 Use Case 2 – District energy management
  • 4.2.1 Grid devices interfacing MAS and other Mas2tering components
  • 4.2.2 Communication with electric grid and component locations
  • 4.2.3 Standards usage
  • 4.2.4 Guidelines on Locations
  • 4.3 Use Case 3 – Enhancing grid reliability, performance, and resilience
  • 4.3.1 Devices interfacing MAS and other Mas2tering components
  • 4.3.2 Communication with electric grid and component locations
  • 4.3.3 Standards usage
  • 4.3.4 Guidelines on Locations
  • 5 Summary and conclusion

D5.1 Highlights

Security considerations
Home agents may locally collect and process (personal) raw data, but also exchange it either with local instances of the MAS platform or with other agents hosted remotely, prior to any anonymization process. Furthermore, physical agents may interact with hardware components, such as the smart meters, using web services. Figure 9 depicts the personal data flow from its inception to its storage at various locations, where different security considerations shall apply since either the level of trust is different or the information crosses several security domains. The security domain 1 is represented by the home physical boundaries. All raw data is generated from this location. This is the most sensitive area where all personal data is created.

capture

The security domain 2 may be considered as an extension of the security domain 1, and as such being considered as being sensitive, where personal raw data may be stored. Besides providing a reliable storage capacity, it delivers additional service to the home user, through a graphical user interface (not represented in the diagram). For instance, it could allow remotely managing the home smart appliances through the energy management system. The personal raw data stored in the security domain 2 is exclusively accessible to the home user only.
The security domain 3 is related to the aggregator site where clients’ personal raw data is centrally stored, then anonymized. A first repository contains all personal raw data that are directly published from the home site. This raw data is not intended to be processed by any application but the anonymization process. Then an anonymized repository is made available to all trusted applications that require manipulating the collected data. The security domain 3 is in charge of ensuring the privacy and anonymization of the collected data. The security domain 4 is a third-party security domain, which can have access to anonymized data. Access to the anonymized data is restricted to some trusted remote stakeholders. This is not to be confused with a public access. All data exchanged between assets is protected in terms of confidentiality and authenticity. This means that communication links from [1] to [9] inclusive are protected against eavesdropping, i.e. an encryption channel is established.

D5.1 Conclusion

Communication requirements in Mas2tering can be classified into two categories; first, generic communication requirements which relate to communications concerning the management of the platform; and second, application-specific requirements relating communications concerning services offered by applications built on the platform. In addition, the deliverable identifies the different layers of communication in the Mas2tering platform. This document provides a high level design of the inter-communication between agents and the agents’ communication with other smart grid components that are considered in the three Mas2tering use cases. Mas2tering communication architecture consists of a holonic organisation of the multi-agent system and addresses challenges of the smart grid such as security, scalability and distributed management.

The content of exchanged messages between agents needs to conform to a common syntax and semantics. The standard language specification FIPA-ACL is supported in the JADE framework adopted by Mas2tering. An upper ontology based on CIM is considered a candidate to facilitate data exchange and interoperability between agents and with other components. IEC 61850 supports interoperability between IEDs within substations. The document discusses the use of FIPA-ACL, CIM, IEC 61850 and other relevant standards for the message specification and communication between agents.
A communication model is described that identifies communication links between the different types of agents and the characteristics of the communication including socio-economic agents, control agents, service agents, physical agents and management agents. The model further describes protocols and other specifications that are required to facilitate the communication between agents (including communication with components outside the MAS) at different interconnection levels. Security and privacy considerations in the communication between agents and grid components including technologies and standards to be used are also analyzed. FIWARE GEs provide a range of non-domain specific support features that can be leveraged by Mas2tering platform. The GE evaluation described in the deliverable indicates that the most relevant GEs are in the area of enhancing communication security and privacy. One of the main challenges in using FIWARE GEs is that can be removed from their catalogue as in the case of Content based Security GE which has been removed during our evaluation.

The document also discusses the design of the communication and interfaces for each of the three use cases. It describes the grid hardware devices that interact with the MAS components, device and agent locations, communication needs and operational constraints. It examines the communication-related standards and technologies that need to be used or integrated in the implementation of communication components of the use case. Finally, based on the analysis of the use cases the deliverable provides guidelines on the locations of agents to identify the best locations for the MAS components in the electricity network ensuring that Mas2tering can obtain required information while not affecting the operation of the grid.

D5.1 Download Link

mas2tering_deliverable_5-1_individual-agent-communication-interface-design